2 Days, 10 Hours, 600 Questions: What Happened When Mark Zuckerberg Went to Washington

2 Days, 10 Hours, 600 Questions: What Happened When Mark Zuckerberg Went to Washington

Video

Zuckerberg’s Testimony, Explained

Senator John Kennedy told Mark Zuckerberg, the chief executive of Facebook, that his company’s user agreement “sucks.” Our reporter Sheera Frenkel explains the senator’s questions, Mr. Zuckerberg’s answers and what they really mean.

By SHEERA FRENKEL and GRANT GOLD on Publish Date April 11, 2018.

Photo by Tom Brenner/The New York Times.

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Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s founder, endured a rite of passage this week that other powerful executives have gone through before: a public grilling before Congress.
Over two days, nearly 100 lawmakers in the House and Senate interrogated Mr. Zuckerberg about the company’s handling of user information. He faced almost 600 questions, including whether the company should be more heavily regulated, whether it intentionally censors conservative content and how much Russians may have meddled..

After Cambridge Analytica, Privacy Experts Get to Say ‘I Told You So’

After Cambridge Analytica, Privacy Experts Get to Say ‘I Told You So’
PALO ALTO, Calif. — Doc Searls met with a group of his fellow internet privacy experts one recent afternoon here at the Computer History Museum. On a whiteboard were the words “OUTRAGE” and “MAKE HAY” — capitalized, underlined and surrounded by lines jutting in all directions like a cartoon “BOOM!”
For the first time in years, their field of expertise was front and center. Facebook had just become embroiled in a controversy over how the political data firm Cambridge Analytica had improperly harvested the information of up to 87 million users of the social network.
Seated in a wide circle of folding chairs, members of the group excitedly discussed what they could do next.
“A lot of geeks in the world are looking at Facebook as a redwood that’s starting to fall,” said Mr. Searls, whose given name is David and who created Project VRM, a program at Harvard University’s Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society that se..

IPOB Press Release!!! JUSTICE BINTA MURTALA-NYAKO SHOULD DO JUSTICE TO IPOB THE SAME WAY SHE DID TO BOKO HARAM SUSPECTS

PRESS RELEASE FROM: Indigenous Peoples of Biafra (IPOB) DATELINE: London UK, 12th April, 2018 RE: JUSTICE BINTA MURTALA-NYAKO SHOULD DO JUSTICE TO IPOB THE SAME WAY SHE DID TO BOKO HARAM SUSPECTS  The Indigenous Peoples of Biafra (IPOB) hereby wish to acknowledge Justice Binta Murtala-Nyako for the uncommon courage she demonstrated days ago in dismissing…

Zuckerberg Faces Hostile Congress as Calls for Regulation Mount

Zuckerberg Faces Hostile Congress as Calls for Regulation Mount Video Zuckerberg Faces Tough Questions From the House Members of the Energy and Commerce Committee pressed Facebook’s chief executive on data privacy, security and political bias on the social media platform.
By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. Photo by Jose Luis Magana/Associated Press. Watch in Times Video » embed WASHINGTON — After two days and more than 10 hours of questioning of Mark Zuckerberg, the Facebook chief executive, there was widespread consensus among lawmakers that social media technology — and its potential for abuse — had far outpaced Washington and that Congress should step in to close the gap.
But the agreement largely ended there. For lawmakers, the calculus is tricky: They do not want to infringe on First Amendment rights or hurt Silicon Valley innovation but are also unsure how to regulate this new breed of company, which wields enormous power by collecting vast amounts of private data from billions of consume..

The Shift: Facebook Is Complicated. That Shouldn’t Stop Lawmakers.

Facebook Is Complicated. That Shouldn’t Stop Lawmakers. Photo Members of Congress had a mixed bag of concerns for Mark Zuckerberg this week, including points about Facebook’s privacy and data collection policies. Credit Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times WASHINGTON — When it comes to regulating Facebook, Congress is in over its head. But does that matter?
This week’s marathon testimony by Mark Zuckerberg, the social network’s chief executive, revealed the limited understanding many lawmakers have of what Facebook is and how it works. Members of Congress came with a mixed bag of concerns for Mr. Zuckerberg, including a few incisive points about Facebook’s privacy and data collection policies and a lot of off-topic ramblings about how computers work, but these questions never amounted to a unified theory of Facebook’s troubles, or suggestions of how they might be solved.
It’s tempting to claim that technological illiteracy is the problem — that some older and tech-phobic lawmakers ..

Tech Fix: I Downloaded the Information That Facebook Has on Me. Yikes.

I Downloaded the Information That Facebook Has on Me. Yikes. Video Does Facebook Know You Better Than You Do? What makes you tick, whom you know, where you go, even where you might end up. The information you share in your profile is a mere snippet of what Facebook and its partners really know about you. Kevin Roose, a technology columnist for The Times, explains.
By AINARA TIEFENTHÄLER, ROBIN STEIN and KEVIN ROOSE on Publish Date April 9, 2018. . Watch in Times Video » embed When I downloaded a copy of my Facebook data last week, I didn’t expect to see much. My profile is sparse, I rarely post anything on the site, and I seldom click on ads. (I’m what some call a Facebook “lurker.”)
But when I opened my file, it was like opening Pandora’s box.
With a few clicks, I learned that about 500 advertisers — many that I had never heard of, like Bad Dad, a motorcycle parts store, and Space Jesus, an electronica band — had my contact information, which could include my email address, phone num..