Philip-Effiong

General Phillip Effiong

General Phillip Effiong, Ojukwu’s Deputy is Dead.  November 08, 2003 THE defunct Biafran General who signed the surrender document with Colonel Olusegun Obasanjo, Chief Phillip Effiong is dead, Radio Nigeria reported yesterday. Chief Effiong who held the chieftaincy title of Akakang Ibimo Ibom (the people’s sword ) was 78.

Biafra Coat of Arms

Ojukwu’s Post Biafra Speech

Ojukwu’s Call from Exile Statement issued through the Biafran Information agency in Geneva and reproduced verbatim in The Times, 16 January 1970. Three days ago I left the Republic of Biafra with certain members of my Cabinet as a result of a decision taken by that Cabinet in the interest of our people’s survival. Since my departure events have moved with such breathless speed that friends and foe alike have been left not only bewildered but confused.

THE IGBO OF NIGERIA

History and Culture          The Igbo, sometimes referred to as Ibo, are one of the largest single ethnic groups in Africa. Most Igbo speakers are based in southeast Nigeria, where they make up almost 17% of the population; they can also be found in significant numbers in Cameroon and Equatorial Guinea. Their language is also called Igbo. The primary Igbo states in Nigeria are Anambra, Abia, Imo, Ebonyi, and Enugu States.

Flag of Biafra

Ahiara Declaration June 1st 1969

THE AHIARA DECLARATION The Principles of the Biafran Revolution June 1st 1969 by EMEKA OJUKWU General of the People’s Army INTRODUCTION PROUD AND COURAGEOUS BIAFRANS, FELLOW COUNTRY MEN AND WOMEN, I salute you. Today, as I look back over our two years as a sovereign and independent nation, I am overwhelmed with the feeling of pride and satisfaction in our performance and achievement as a people. Our indomitable will, our courage, our endurance of the severest privations, our resourcefulness and inventiveness in the face of tremendous odds and dangers, have become proverbial in a world so bereft of heroism, and have become a source of frustration to Nigeria and her foreign masters. For this and for the many miracles of our time, let us give thanks to Almighty God. I congratulate all Biafrans at home and abroad. I thank you all the part you have played and have continued to play in this struggle, for your devotion to the high ideals and principles on which this Republic was founded.

Chukwuemeka-Odumegwu-Ojukwu-Biafra-General-HEAD-of-state

General Ikemba Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu

General Chukwuemeka Odumegwu Ojukwu (4 November 1933[1] – 26 November 2011[2]) was a Nigerian military officer and politician. Ojukwu served as the military governor of the Eastern Region of Nigeria in 1966, the leader of the breakaway Republic of Biafra from 1967 to 1970 and a Nigerian politician from 1983 to 2011, when he died, aged 78.[3] Career Ojukwu came into national prominence upon his appointment as military governor in 1966 and his actions thereafter.

THE REPUBLIC OF BIAFRA

1967 Published by the Government of the Republic of Biafra. Introduction A new nation has been born. Fourteen million people have taken their destiny into their own hands and embarked on the task of building a nation free from fear, bitterness and hate. Their sole aim is to develop their innate capabilities and rear their children in an atmosphere of peace and security. They stretch their hands of fellowship to all nations and appeal for understanding, friendship and co-operation. We, Biafrans, opted for self-determination after a long period of heart-searching and after making desperate efforts to save the Federation of Nigeria from disintegration. More than any other people in the former Federation, Biafrans contributed their human and material resources to the cause of national unity. From 1914, when the British amalgamated Northern and Southern Nigeria, Biafrans began to leave their homeland in large numbers to settle in several places among the Fulani-Hausa in the North and the Yoruba in the West. In those areas they opened up new avenues of commerce and industry and at the same time built new homes and erected places of worship and institutions of learning. By so doing they came to acquire a real stake in the progress and well-being of ALL parts of the country. They regarded themselves as citizens of Nigeria to an extent that no other group in the country ever did.