Peppa Pig's march into Asia boosts Entertainment One revenues

Entertainment One warns that the collapse of Toys R Us will have “some impact” on brands like Peppa Pig as kids scramble for toys
Peppa Pig is beefing up the revenues of TV and film company Entertainment One as its popularity expands in global markets.
In its latest trading update, Entertainment One said it expects revenue from its family division, which includes its most popular children’s animations, to rise by 50 per cent in the year ending 31 March.
Strong growth in the firm's family division offset a lower than expected performance in its film unit.

Read more Spotify sees big Wall Street debut amid tech sector turmoil Helped by “significant interest in China”, Peppa Pig is expected to grow full year revenues by 18 per cent.
The cartoon character has already generated more than 45 billion views on Chinese video platforms and made its debut in Japan last October.
Entertainment One warned that the collapse of retailer Toys R Us will have “some impact” on brands like P..

UK construction suffers biggest drop in activity since Brexit vote due to snow disruption in March

The latest Purchasing Managers’ Index for the sector came in at 47, down from 51.4 in February and below the 50 point that separates expansion from contraction
The UK construction industry suffered its biggest drop in activity since the 2016 Brexit vote in March thanks to severe weather disruption due to the “Beast from the East”.
The latest Purchasing Managers’ Index for the sector came in at 47, down from 51.4 in February and below the 50 point that separates expansion from contraction.
Read more UK construction output falls at fastest rate in six years UK construction ‘flat as pancake’ in February Over 300 Carillion workers made redundant as fallout worsens City of London analysts had pencilled in a reading of 50.8.
Civil engineering saw its biggest drop in activity in five years. Commercial construction also fell sharply. Housebuilding, however, fared better in the month.
“Snow-related disruption was a key factor behind the marked decline in activity on site reported by sur..

China Strikes Back at the U.S. With Its Own Tariffs

Supported by Business Day China Strikes Back at the U.S. With Its Own Tariffs Photo China on Wednesday outlined plans to impose tariffs on soybeans and other American goods. Credit Daniel Acker/Bloomberg SHANGHAI — China hit back at the United States on Wednesday with proposed tariffs on American soybeans, cars, chemicals and other goods, in a move likely to spark fears that the countries’ escalating confrontation could become an all-out trade war.
Moving with unusual speed, Chinese officials outlined plans to make it more costly to import 106 categories of American goods into China. The move came just hours after the Trump administration detailed its plan to impose tariffs on $50 billion in Chinese-made steel, aircraft parts, televisions and other products.
China’s new tariffs will amount to 25 percent on the American products. While Beijing did not immediately specify the value of the American goods that would be affected, government officials have said it would be roughly equal..

Children understand the value of money by age of 10, survey finds

Nearly a third of parents wish their own parents had taught them the importance of saving when they were young
Parents believe their children understand the value of money at 10 years old on average, a survey has found.
This is the age they stop believing money is infinite, that it must be earned, and it is important to save, according to the research from Santander.
While the average age across the survey for parents thinking their child had grasped how money works was 10, one in 14 (7 per cent) parents believed their child had understood the concept of money by the age of five.
Read more True scale of gender pay gap at UK's large firms set to be revealed The survey, which included the views of five to 15-year-olds as well as parents, found nearly nine in 10 (89 per cent) of boys said they like to save money for the future, compared with just over three-quarters (77 per cent) of girls.
When children were asked why they like to save money, nearly half (47 per cent) want to..