News Analysis: From One Attack in Syria, a World of Potential Risks

From One Attack in Syria, a World of Potential Risks Photo “No amount of American blood or treasure can produce lasting peace and security in the Middle East,” President Trump said in his statement announcing the airstrikes. “It’s a troubled place. We will try to make it better, but it is a troubled place.” Credit Tom Brenner/The New York Times BEIRUT, Lebanon — For the second time in just over a year, President Trump, in sending missiles crashing into Syrian military targets, added American firepower to one of the most complex and multisided conflicts in a generation.
One immediate question was whether the strikes could actually accomplish the stated goal of diminishing Syria’s capacity to make and use chemical weapons. But the new strikes also posed the risk of drawing the United States even more deeply into a conflict in which Russia and Iran — who warned Mr. Trump not to intervene — have more invested than ever in keeping President Bashar al-Assad in power.
The strikes hit Syria be..

U.S., Britain and France Strike Syria Over Suspected Chemical Weapons Attack

U.S., Britain and France Strike Syria Over Suspected Chemical Weapons Attack Video Trump Announces Airstrikes Against Syria In an address from the White House, President Trump said the United States and European allies sought to punish Syria’s president for a suspected chemical attack.
By U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT on Publish Date April 13, 2018. Photo by Tom Brenner/The New York Times. Watch in Times Video » embed WASHINGTON — The United States and European allies launched airstrikes on Friday night against Syrian research, storage and military targets as President Trump sought to punish President Bashar al-Assad for a suspected chemical attack near Damascus last weekend that killed more than 40 people.
Britain and France joined the United States in the strikes in a coordinated operation that was intended to show Western resolve in the face of what the leaders of the three nations called persistent violations of international law. Mr. Trump characterized it as the beginning of a sustained..

Tests reveal substitute ingredients in supermarket own-brand pestos

Which? found pestos contained cheaper alternatives to the traditional ingredients, such as sugar and carrot fibre
Italian pesto sold by UK supermarkets contains substitute and often cheaper ingredients such as sunflower oil, carrot and even bamboo fibres, an investigation has found.
A test of 12 own-brand standard and premium pestos – all made in Italy – found a range of additions to the sauce's traditional four key ingredients of basil, pine nuts, parmesan and olive oil.
Which? found all of the standard pestos were made with between 42 per cent and 49 per cent basil, but also contained cheaper alternatives to the traditional ingredients such as cashew nuts instead of pine nuts, or a mix of both.
Read more Mothercare sales drop even further as fewer people visit its stores Olive oil was also substituted with sunflower oil, and parmesan with less expensive Grana Padano and Pecorino Romano cheeses.
All of the standard pestos, apart from Waitrose's £1.35 version, used th..

Trilobites: Sea Turtles Use Magnetic Fields to Find Their Birthplace Beach

Sea Turtles Use Magnetic Fields to Find Their Birthplace Beach Photo Loggerhead turtles are known to use the earth’s magnetic fields to nest on Florida’s Gulf beaches within about 40 to 50 miles of where they were born decades earlier. Credit J. Roger Brothers/UNC-Chapel Hill Sea turtles use the earth’s magnetic fields to navigate back to the area where they were born decades earlier, according to a new study that used loggerhead genetics to investigate their travels.
After swimming for years in a giant loop from nesting grounds in North Carolina and Florida to North Africa, the turtles find their way back to nest on beaches within about 40 to 50 miles of where they were born. The new study suggests that the turtles learned their home beach’s distinctive magnetic signature, through what is called geomagnetic imprinting.
“This is vital information if you want to restore sea turtles to areas where they once lived before being hunted to extinction,” said Kenneth Lohmann, a professor at th..

The Saturday Profile: In Homogeneous Japan, an African-Born University President

In Homogeneous Japan, an African-Born University President Photo Oussouby Sacko, the new, Mali-born president of Kyoto Seika University, at his inauguration party this month. Credit Kosuke Okahara for The New York Times KYOTO, Japan — On a beautiful spring Sunday during cherry blossom season, the new president of Kyoto Seika University welcomed students for the start of the Japanese school year. “You have left your home,” he told the 770 first-year and graduate students gathered in a gym on the hilly campus. “But this is also your home.”
In Bamanankan — the lingua franca of his native Mali.
And so Oussouby Sacko, 51, quickly dispensed with the elephant in the room: He is a black man in a homogeneous country that has long had an ambivalent relationship with outsiders.
Dr. Sacko, who is believed to be the first African-born president of a Japanese university, segued elegantly into fluent Japanese, invoking Hannah Arendt, Edward Said, Eleanor Roosevelt and the Malian writer Amadou Hampâté..