Walmart Pulls Cosmo From Checkout. Plus! Guess Who’s Claiming Victory.

Supported by Media Walmart Pulls Cosmo From Checkout. Plus! Guess Who’s Claiming Victory. Photo Walmart will remove Cosmopolitan from its checkout aisle displays. Credit Zvi Lowenthal/The New York Times Walmart customers looking to toss the latest issue of Cosmopolitan magazine into their shopping carts will have to search the superstore a little harder.
The retailer has decided to remove the magazine from its checkout aisle displays in its 5,000-plus stores in the United States, in a move announced by a nonprofit anti-pornography group that connected the company’s decision to the #MeToo movement.
The magazines will be placed on racks elsewhere, varying by store. The April issue features Cardi B, the reality star turned rapper, who gives an “uncensored and totally amazing” interview inside. Other headlines promise tips on sex toys and foreplay, the secrets of super-close couples and this teaser: “Could you be guilty of micro-cheating? Could he?”
Walmart, in a statement, acknowledg..

Heineken Pulls ‘Lighter Is Better’ Ad After Outcry Over Racism

Supported by Media Heineken Pulls ‘Lighter Is Better’ Ad After Outcry Over Racism Photo Heineken removed a series of commercials featuring the tagline “sometimes, lighter is better” after one of the ads was criticized as racist. Credit Peter Dejong/Associated Press Heineken pulled a series of commercials for light beer this week that featured the tagline “sometimes, lighter is better,” after one of the ads was criticized as racist.
The brewer, which became the latest company to face criticism over marketing that appears to support a preference for fair complexions, responded to the controversy on Monday.
“We missed the mark, are taking the feedback to heart and will use this to influence future campaigns,” Heineken U.S. said.
In the ad, a vigilant bartender spots a faraway female patron gazing disappointingly at a wine glass. Quickly, he opens a beer bottle and slides it down the bar.
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Continue reading the main story On its journey over multiple surfaces, the bottle..

4,000 Eggs and Embryos Are Lost in Tank Failure, Ohio Fertility Clinic Says

Supported by U.S. 4,000 Eggs and Embryos Are Lost in Tank Failure, Ohio Fertility Clinic Says Photo Amber and Elliott Ash with their son, Ethan. The couple, who say they had two embryos at a fertility clinic run by University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, have filed a class-action lawsuit against the hospital. Credit Ash family, via Associated Press The “catastrophic” failure of a storage tank this month at an Ohio fertility clinic caused the apparent loss of more than 4,000 frozen embryos and eggs, the clinic said this week.
About 950 patients were affected by the failure, in which the tank’s temperature rose and an alarm did not go off, the University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, which oversees the clinic, said in a letter that was sent to patients on Monday and posted on its website.
“We are heartbroken to tell you that it’s unlikely any are viable,” the letter said.
The letter was an update to an announcement on March 8 that the tissue storage bank where eggs and ..

Ask Well: Do Face Masks Really Keep You Healthy?

Supported by Well | Live Do Face Masks Really Keep You Healthy? Photo Credit iStock Q. How effective are antimicrobial “courtesy masks” at preventing the spread of contagious airborne illnesses?
A. The best evidence suggests that, when sick, wearing a mask can help to protect others from getting sick. And when well, wearing a mask around those who are sick will probably decrease your own chances of becoming infected. But the masks are far from foolproof.
Courtesy masks, or what we doctors refer to as surgical masks, were introduced into the operating room in the late 1800s. They quickly became popular among a public eager to protect itself against the influenza pandemic of 1918.
A century later, the advent of modern molecular techniques confirmed that surgical masks can indeed provide good protection against flu. In a 2013 study, researchers counted the number of virus particles in the air around patients with flu. They found that surgical masks decreased the exhalation of large v..