Motion Picture Academy Finds No Merit to Accusations Against Its President

Supported by Media Motion Picture Academy Finds No Merit to Accusations Against Its President Photo John Bailey, the president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. The inquiry focused on a claim that Mr. Bailey had attempted to touch a woman inappropriately about a decade ago. Credit David McNew/Reuters LOS ANGELES — The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences concluded on Tuesday that an allegation of sexual harassment against its president had no merit, in the first test of new guidelines that the powerful Hollywood industry group enacted after a wave of accusations of inappropriate behavior rocked the entertainment industry.
In a statement released after its regularly scheduled board meeting, the academy said that an internal investigation into allegations levied against John Bailey, who was elected as president of the group in August, had determined that “no further action was merited.”
Mr. Bailey, a cinematographer with credits ranging from “Ordinary People..

Julie Yip-Williams, Writer of Candid Blog on Cancer, Dies at 42

Supported by Obituaries Julie Yip-Williams, Writer of Candid Blog on Cancer, Dies at 42 Photo Julie Yip-Williams in a family photograph at her home in Brooklyn in January. “Rejoice in life and all of its beauty,” she told her children. Julie Yip-Williams, whose candid blog about having Stage IV colon cancer also described a life of struggles that began with being born blind in Vietnam and her ethnic Chinese family’s escape in a rickety fishing boat, died on Monday at her home in Brooklyn. She was 42.
Joshua Williams, her husband, said the cause was metastatic colon cancer.
Ms. Yip-Williams’s richly detailed blog, which she started writing after receiving her diagnosis in 2013, was more than an account of her siege with cancer. It was also a meditation on love and family as well as a message of openness to her young daughters, Mia and Isabelle, about her illness.
Ms. Yip-Williams wrestled with hope, which she cursed as an “illusory sentiment.”
“Cancer crushes hope, leaving a wastel..

Matter: Was a Tiny Mummy in the Atacama an Alien? No, but the Real Story Is Almost as Strange

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Was a Tiny Mummy in the Atacama an Alien? No, but the Real Story Is Almost as Strange

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Nearly two decades ago, the rumors began: In the Atacama Desert of northern Chile, someone had discovered a tiny mummified alien.
An amateur collector exploring a ghost town was said to have come across a white cloth in a leather pouch. Unwrapping it, he found a six-inch-long skeleton.
Despite its size, the skeleton was remarkably complete. It even had hardened teeth. And yet there were striking anomalies: it had 10 ribs instead of the usual 12, giant eye sockets and a long skull that ended in a point.
Ata, as the remains came to be known, ended up in a private collection, but the rumors continued, fueled in part by a U.F.O. documentary in 2013 that featured the skeleton. On Thursday, a team of scientists presented a very different explanation for Ata — one without aliens, but intriguing in its own way.

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They Were ‘Known Only to God.’ Now Argentina’s Falklands War Dead Are Named.

They Were ‘Known Only to God.’ Now Argentina’s Falklands War Dead Are Named. Photo Relatives of an Argentine soldier killed in the 1982 war between Argentina and Britain visiting Darwin Military Cemetery in the Falkland Islands, known by Argentina as the Malvinas. Credit Argentinian Presidency BUENOS AIRES — When Dalal Abd de Massad went to the Darwin cemetery in the Falkland Islands this week it was the first time that she had hugged the gravestone with her son’s name.
“I was finally able to cry at his grave,” Ms. Abd said of her son, Daniel. “I talked to him, told him everything that happened in these years. I hugged that white cross as if I was hugging him.”
Ms. Abd and her husband, Osvaldo Said Massad, were part of a delegation of 250, mostly family members of fallen soldiers, who traveled to the disputed islands for a ceremony to mark the identification of 90 Argentine service members who died in a 1982 war with Britain and had been buried as unknown soldiers.
For 36 years, the pl..

Netflix Adds a Warning Video to ‘13 Reasons Why’

Supported by Television Netflix Adds a Warning Video to ‘13 Reasons Why’ Photo Katherine Langford in the Netflix series “13 Reasons Why,” about a teenager who kills herself. Credit Beth Dubber/Netflix, via Associated Press Netflix has added a warning video that will play before its series “13 Reasons Why” and will promote resources to help young viewers and their parents address the show’s themes, the streaming service announced Wednesday.
After being criticized for how the series’ first season depicted suicide, which had already led the network to add warning messages to the show, Netflix commissioned a study by the Northwestern University Center on Media and Human Development to gauge its impact on viewers. The show’s second season will be released this year.
According to a statement from Netflix, the study showed that “nearly three-quarters of teen and young adult viewers said the show made them feel more comfortable processing tough topics.”
However, the results also showed th..

Pope Rejects Call for Apology to Canada’s Indigenous People

Pope Rejects Call for Apology to Canada’s Indigenous People Photo Pope Francis, above in Rome this week, will not apologize for the church’s role in a Canadian system that forced generations of Indigenous children into boarding schools. Credit Franco Origlia/Getty Images OTTAWA — Despite a personal appeal from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the Roman Catholic Church has said that Pope Francis will not apologize for its role in a Canadian system that forced generations of Indigenous children into boarding schools.
The residential school system, as it is commonly known in Canada, was described as a form of “cultural genocide” by a national Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 2015 that also concluded that many students were physically and emotionally abused.
Among its 94 recommendations was a call for an apology from the pope. The Catholic Church, along with several Protestant denominations, operated most of the schools for the government.
“The Holy Father is aware of the findings of t..