Ecuador Cuts Off Julian Assange’s Internet Access. Again.

Ecuador Cuts Off Julian Assange’s Internet Access. Again. Photo Julian Assange has lived at the Ecuadorean Embassy in London since 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden. Credit Ben Stansall/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Ecuador’s government said Wednesday that it had suspended internet access for Julian Assange, the WikiLeaks founder who since 2012 has lived in Ecuador’s Embassy in London, out of concern that he was harming its relationships with Britain and other European nations.
The decision set off a furious reaction from some Assange supporters. One of them, Kim Dotcom, an online renegade who founded a file-sharing site, urged supporters to gather outside the embassy in protest. The filmmaker Oliver Stone wrote on Twitter: “Free Julian Assange! Restore his internet connection!”
Ecuador’s government granted Mr. Assange citizenship in January, the latest step in a longstanding diplomatic standoff. But it said it had suspended Mr. Assange’s online communications on Tuesday becaus..

U.S. Exempts Some Allies From Tariffs, but May Opt for Quotas

U.S. Exempts Some Allies From Tariffs, but May Opt for Quotas Photo The United States trade representative, Robert Lighthizer, outlined the exemptions during questioning in the Senate Finance Committee. Credit Win Mcnamee/Getty Images WASHINGTON — The Trump administration began imposing stiff tariffs on imported steel and aluminum early on Friday morning. But it granted a brief exemption to some allies, and in a twist, said it might impose import quotas to prevent too much foreign metal from flooding into the United States.
The White House detailed the decision in a pair of presidential proclamations late Thursday night. They gave allies that won exemptions a May 1 deadline to negotiate “satisfactory alternative means” to address what the administration calls the threat to United States national security resulting from its current levels of steel and aluminum imports. The exempted group includes Canada, Mexico, the European Union, Australia, Argentina, Brazil and South Korea.
President..

How Calls for Privacy May Upend Business for Facebook and Google

How Calls for Privacy May Upend Business for Facebook and Google Photo The recent revelation that the voter profiling company Cambridge Analytica harvested data from 50 million Facebook users has raised an uproar over the digital business model of consumers giving up their data for free services. Credit Josh Edelson/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images SAN FRANCISCO — The contemporary internet was built on a bargain: Show us who you really are and the digital world will be free to search or share.
People detailed their interests and obsessions on Facebook and Google, generating a river of data that could be collected and harnessed for advertising. The companies became very rich. Users seemed happy. Privacy was deemed obsolete, like bloodletting and milkmen.
Now, the consumer surveillance model underlying Facebook and Google’s free services is under siege from users, regulators and legislators on both sides of the Atlantic. It amounts to a crisis for an internet industry that up until no..

The Sweet Spot: I Had an Affair With a Co-Worker. He Betrayed Me. Now What?

Supported by Style I Had an Affair With a Co-Worker. He Betrayed Me. Now What? Photo Credit Heidi Younger Dear Sugars,
I had an affair with a co-worker that lasted several months. Though I had reservations about his character, we had an intense sexual connection. Due to the small, gossipy nature of our workplace, I repeatedly demanded discretion. He promised to never discuss my private life at work.
I found myself falling for him and needed to set boundaries, so I ended the affair. Soon after this, my co-worker’s supervisor revealed he’d been hearing about our relationship from Day 1. He knew details about my sexuality (I’m bisexual, but not out at work) and our affair that he could only have learned from my ex, who it seems was seeking validation from his buddies by bragging about our involvement.
I was devastated, but I also blamed myself. It’s not against company policy to date co-workers, but I should’ve trusted my gut. Instead, I was guided by my lust. The consequence is that..

Tanzina Vega Is New Host of WNYC’s ‘The Takeaway’

Supported by Business Day Tanzina Vega Is New Host of WNYC’s ‘The Takeaway’ Photo Tanzina Vega will start as the new host of the public radio program “The Takeaway” on May 7. Credit Janette Pellegrini/Getty Images Tanzina Vega has been named the new host of the public radio program “The Takeaway,” succeeding John Hockenberry, who retired in August and was subsequently accused of engaging in sexual harassment and bullying behavior during his decade with the show.
Ms. Vega, who will begin working on the nationally syndicated news program on May 7, was most recently at CNN, where she reported on race, inequality and the criminal justice system. She was previously a reporter for The New York Times.
“Since its inception, ‘The Takeaway’ has sought out voices from across the country to provide context for and perspective on the day’s news,” Alisa Miller, president and chief executive of Public Radio International, which produces the show with WNYC Radio, said in a statement. “Tanzina’s d..