Bomb in Syria Kills 2 Members of U.S.-Led Coalition

Bomb in Syria Kills 2 Members of U.S.-Led Coalition
Two members of the United States-led coalition fighting in Syria were killed and five others wounded by a bomb in a late-night attack, the military said on Friday.
The attack took place about 11 p.m. local time on Thursday, and used “an improvised explosive device,” the United States Central Command, which directs American forces in the region, said in a statement.
It did not reveal the identities or nationalities of the service members involved, how seriously the survivors were hurt, or where in Syria the attack occurred.
“The names of the deceased will be released at the discretion of the pertinent national authorities,” it said. “Details pertaining to the incident are being withheld pending further investigation.”
Coalition forces have been deployed to Syria to fight, alongside Kurdish militia allies, against the Islamic State. But with that group largely routed, the seven-year civil war in Syria has entered a dangerous new phase…

Ask Well: Can You Get Two Colds at Once?

Supported by Well | Live Can You Get Two Colds at Once? Photo Credit iStock Q. Can I get two colds at once?
A. Yes, you can. The phenomenon is known medically as coinfection and occurs when two germs, in this case viruses, cause infections at the same time.
More than 100 viruses can cause the common cold, so it’s not unusual to be exposed to two at once. And, since one virus doesn’t typically confer immunity against the other, it’s not unusual to be infected by two viruses at once.
The best data about coinfection come from studies of more serious viruses, such as H.I.V. and hepatitis. These studies show that coinfection can worsen, ameliorate or have no impact on the course of an illness. The outcome depends on the viruses involved.
With H.I.V., coinfection with the two main types, H.I.V.-1 and H.I.V.-2, is actually beneficial. It slows the progression of the disease. Coinfection with H.I.V. and hepatitis C virus, on the other hand, worsens the outcome.
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Can North Korea Handle a K-Pop Invasion?

Can North Korea Handle a K-Pop Invasion? Photo Red Velvet on stage in Tokyo, a few days before its Pyongyang debut. According to one Japanese fan, “If anyone can help achieve peace, they can.” Credit Avex Entertainment Inc. TOKYO — Cavorting in sparkly miniskirts and midriff-baring tops, the five members of Red Velvet, one of South Korea’s most popular girl bands, belted out one of their hits, “Red Flavor.”
“We look good together, we’re pretty cool / I like it, it was love at first sight,” they crooned in Japanese, tossing their long hair and flashing runway-worthy pouts on Thursday night, as 10,000 fans at a Tokyo arena shrieked and waved bright pink light sticks in unison to the hip-hop beat.
Yes, but will it play in Pyongyang?
On Saturday, Red Velvet, along with 10 other acts from South Korea, will travel to North Korea to perform in concerts staged by Seoul as part of a campaign of cultural diplomacy.
It is yet another sign of how the usually reclusive North Korean regime is strate..