Sidelined by Scandal, Mario Batali Is Eyeing His Second Act

Supported by Food Sidelined by Scandal, Mario Batali Is Eyeing His Second Act Photo The celebrity chef Mario Batali speaking at a benefit for Teens for Food Justice at his restaurant La Sirena in November. In news reports the next month, several women described a decades-long pattern of abusive behavior in his empire.
Credit Krista Schlueter for The New York Times On a gloomy Friday afternoon in February, Mario Batali sat down for coffee at the Marlton Hotel, a few blocks from Babbo, his restaurant in Greenwich Village. His guest was the food consultant and writer Christine Muhlke.
Mr. Batali had called the meeting, as he has with several other people whose opinions he trusts, to figure out how his life and career might recover from a disastrous turn.
In December, a series of news reports about the celebrity chef began tumbling out. Several women described a decades-long pattern of abusive behavior both in his empire and at restaurants owned by friends that ranged from lewd, drunk..

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