Trump, Lacking Leverage Over North Korea, Takes Aim at South Instead

Trump, Lacking Leverage Over North Korea, Takes Aim at South Instead Photo President Trump delivering a speech in Richfield, Ohio, on Thursday. Analysts say Mr. Trump’s decision to link a trade deal with South Korea to progress in denuclearizing North Korea shows a growing unease in Washington. Credit Tom Brenner/The New York Times SEOUL, South Korea — South Korea settled disputes with the Trump administration over steel tariffs and the revision of a free-trade agreement this week. With those stumbling blocks cleared, it hoped the two governments could focus on the more pressing crisis of North Korea’s nuclear weapons.
As it turned out, South Korea was celebrating too early.
On Thursday, President Trump said he might postpone finalizing the trade agreement with South Korea, which he had earlier described as “a wonderful deal with a wonderful ally,” until he secured a deal in denuclearizing North Korea.
“You know why?” he said. “Because it’s a very strong card.”
By tying a trade deal wi..

Your Money: A Student Loan Fix for a Teacher, and Many Other Public Servants

Supported by Your Money A Student Loan Fix for a Teacher, and Many Other Public Servants Photo Jed Shafer, a teacher, had pretty much given up on receiving full credit for repayments under the public service loan forgiveness program. But things changed, and not just for him, after a “Your Money” column about the case in October. Credit Ruth Fremson/The New York Times In October, I wrote a column about Jed Shafer, a teacher in Oregon who found himself on the wrong end of the student loan repayment bureaucracy.
Mr. Shafer thought he was following the rules to qualify for the public service loan forgiveness program, and spent years communicating carefully with the loan servicers who collected his payments on behalf of the federal government. But it turns out he hadn’t been doing it correctly after all.
The result? He learned he was going to have to pay tens of thousands of dollars extra. After many months of pleading his case to his loan servicer and the Department of Education, he’d..

Strategies: Why a Bigger Dose of Market Panic Could Help

Supported by Business Day Why a Bigger Dose of Market Panic Could Help Photo Credit Minh Uong/The New York Times The most surprising thing about the wobbly stock market of 2018 is that investors haven’t panicked — or at least that they haven’t panicked much.
That’s the view of James W. Paulsen, chief investment strategist of the Leuthold Group, an investment research firm based in Minneapolis. In some ways, panic is a subjective thing, he acknowledges, and it may seem that the storms that have swept through the stock market since early February have been more than enough already.
But Mr. Paulsen has data to back up his view that investors have maintained their composure to a surprising degree, and maintains that a bigger dose of fear could have a salutary effect.
“I think a much bigger panic is probably going to happen,” he said. “And I think the best thing for the market would be if it happened soon and we could just move on from there.”
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