If we're going Dutch on takeovers please can we first plan the route?

City talk is of having an open, post-Brexit economy. So shouldn’t we be changing our approach to takeovers too?
Blimey. I had no idea. I simply did not realise that GKN was so vital to the interests of national security. There I was, supposing it was a car parts manufacturer with a bit of aerospace thrown in, and yes, a weeny slice of defence. And an underperforming, uninspiring amalgam at that. Then, along comes a bidder, Melrose, and flags are raised, and the national anthem sung. Melrose is portrayed in some sections of the media as a “vulture” and “asset stripper”, while GKN is hailed as a “British colossus”. GKN, didn’t you know, once made Spitfires (well, a small portion but not all, but hey ho), and the barricades must be manned. This, despite the reality that Melrose is itself British.
Unions and politicians get drawn into the conflict, pronouncing sonorously that GKN must be saved at all costs. To no avail, as some major investors indicate they are siding with Melrose. Then..

England to Abolish Burial and Cremation Fees for Children

England to Abolish Burial and Cremation Fees for Children Photo The office of Prime Minister Theresa May of Britain noted that families faced thousands of pounds in local authority fees for burials or cremations. Credit John Thys/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images LONDON — Parents in England will not be charged burial and cremation fees for children after Prime Minister Theresa May announced that the government would set up a fund to cover the charges.
The announcement on Saturday came after a campaign by an opposition Labour lawmaker, Carolyn Harris, whose 8-year-old son died in a road accident. The charges on parents were waived in Wales last year.
Mrs. May said in a statement, “In the raw pain of immediate loss, it cannot be right that grieving parents should have to worry about how to meet the funeral costs for a child they hoped to see grow into adulthood.”
“In the darkest moment of any parent’s life there is little light, but there can be support,” she added.
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As Facebook Struggles, Rivals’ Leaders Stay (Mostly) Mum

As Facebook Struggles, Rivals’ Leaders Stay (Mostly) Mum Photo Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, has suggested that new regulation protecting personal data might be in order. Credit Jim Young/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images The recent tribulations of Facebook, which has lurched from crisis to crisis over the past year, most recently over the handling of user’s personal data, has pushed a few of the industry’s most prominent names to speak out against the company.
Marc Benioff, the chief executive of Salesforce.com, has compared the deleterious effects of social media to those of tobacco and alcohol, and has called for more regulation of those tech companies. Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s chief executive, has also suggested new regulation protecting personal data might be in order for businesses like Facebook.
“I think that this certain situation is so dire and has become so large that probably some well-crafted regulation is necessary,” Mr. Cook said recently at an event in Chin..