Russian Accused of Hacking U.S. Tech Firms Is Extradited

Russian Accused of Hacking U.S. Tech Firms Is Extradited Photo Archive YouTube footage featuring Yevgeniy Aleksandrovich Nikulin. His arrest in 2016 quickly turned into a battle between Washington and Moscow over whether he should be tried in the United States. Credit Alexander Zemlianichenko/Associated Press PRAGUE — A Russian man accused of hacking three American technology companies in 2012, possibly compromising the personal information of more than 100 million users, was extradited to the United States on Friday, according to law enforcement officials.
The man, Yevgeniy Aleksandrovich Nikulin, was arrested while visiting the Czech Republic in 2016, and his case quickly turned into a battle between Washington and Moscow over whether he should be tried in the United States.
His arrest came only two days before the Obama administration formally accused the Russian government of stealing and disclosing emails from the Democratic National Committee and other institutions and prominent ..

Tech Tip: Keeping Personal Appointments Private on Google Calendar

Keeping Personal Appointments Private on Google Calendar Q. My office uses the business version of Gmail and Google Calendar. Can other people see my appointments on Google Calendar even if I haven’t sent a sharing invitation?
A. Google’s G Suite is the paid version of its mail, calendar, office software and file-sharing applications, and is designed for businesses. The company’s designated administrator controls the default settings for users, so ask your corporate G Suite master about the specific calendar visibility used across your company.
Google notes that it is “common practice” to use the “See all event details” setting as the default for corporate calendars. This means that other people can add your office calendar to their own list of calendars to manage and plan meetings, videoconferences and other collaborative events. Some offices allow people to see when co-workers have time blocked out on their calendars, but generically label the events as “busy” so that co-workers can ..

Is Gibson, a Totem of Guitar Godhead, Headed for Chapter 11?

Supported by Business Day Is Gibson, a Totem of Guitar Godhead, Headed for Chapter 11? Photo Credit Jens Mortensen for The New York Times Gibson, what happened?
There’s been talk of bankruptcy swirling around Gibson, the venerated Nashville-based guitar company, which takes in more than $1.2 billion in annual revenue but is more than $500 million in debt. Buzzards are circling. Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, the private equity giant, is a bondholder. Blackstone is also a major lender.
Gibson’s problems are not hard to diagnose. The company’s longtime chief executive, Henry Juszkiewicz, wanted to diversify by turning Gibson into what he has called a “music lifestyle company” — basically a consumer electronics business that sells headphones and hi-fis as well as guitars. He made a splashy purchase of the audio and home entertainment division of Netherlands-based Royal Philips in 2014, and then ran headlong into the collapse of the euro.
It was a disaster. Mr. Juszkiewicz, in an interview,..