Sidelined by Scandal, Mario Batali Is Eyeing His Second Act

Supported by Food Sidelined by Scandal, Mario Batali Is Eyeing His Second Act Photo The celebrity chef Mario Batali speaking at a benefit for Teens for Food Justice at his restaurant La Sirena in November. In news reports the next month, several women described a decades-long pattern of abusive behavior in his empire.
Credit Krista Schlueter for The New York Times On a gloomy Friday afternoon in February, Mario Batali sat down for coffee at the Marlton Hotel, a few blocks from Babbo, his restaurant in Greenwich Village. His guest was the food consultant and writer Christine Muhlke.
Mr. Batali had called the meeting, as he has with several other people whose opinions he trusts, to figure out how his life and career might recover from a disastrous turn.
In December, a series of news reports about the celebrity chef began tumbling out. Several women described a decades-long pattern of abusive behavior both in his empire and at restaurants owned by friends that ranged from lewd, drunk..

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Celebrating Mimouna and Its Dose of Post-Passover Carbs

Celebrating Mimouna and Its Dose of Post-Passover Carbs

For American Jews who can’t go too long without their favorite carbohydrates, the end of Passover offers nearly as much cause for celebration as the holiday itself. Many begin right at sundown, wolfing down pizzas. Then come the brownies or other foods with the flour that they have been avoiding in a nod to ancestors who had no time to let bread dough rise while fleeing Egypt.
Unbeknown to many Americans, however, Moroccan Jews have long marked the end of Passover with a more established ritual, a raucous tradition known as Mimouna. Soon after sunset on the last night of the holiday (observed this year on Friday or Saturday), they indulge in the first leavened food since Passover began: moufleta, a pan-cooked cake smeared with butter and honey.
A variety of other Moroccan sweets follow, on a long, elaborately decorated table that includes the requisite mint tea. For Jews in Israel, where many Moroccans immigrated in the decades a..