Why Sinclair Made Dozens of Local News Anchors Recite the Same Script

Supported by Media Why Sinclair Made Dozens of Local News Anchors Recite the Same Script Photo “Unfortunately, some members of the media use their platforms to push their own personal bias and agenda to control exactly what people think,” dozens of news anchors said last month, reading from a script provided by Sinclair Broadcast Group. Credit fro nch, via YouTube On local news stations across the United States last month, dozens of anchors gave the same speech to their combined millions of viewers.
It included a warning about fake news, a promise to report fairly and accurately and a request that viewers go to the station’s website and comment “if you believe our coverage is unfair.”
It may not have seemed strange until viewers began to notice that the newscasters from Seattle to Phoenix to Washington sounded very similar. Stitched-together videos on social media showed them eerily echoing the same lines:
“The sharing of biased and false news has become all too common on social ..

At War: On the Road to Sinjar, Armed Men With Shifting Allegiances Decide Who Can Pass

On the Road to Sinjar, Armed Men With Shifting Allegiances Decide Who Can Pass Photo A member of Hashd al-Shaabi on watch on the outskirts of Tal Afar in February 2017. Credit Ahmad Al-Rubaye/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images Few American reporters have spent more time reporting from Iraq in the last 15 years than Alissa J. Rubin, who served as both a correspondent and the Baghdad bureau chief for The New York Times at the height of the conflict. Rubin returned to Iraq in 2014 to cover the rise of the Islamic State and was severely injured in a helicopter crash on Mount Sinjar while reporting on targeted attacks against the Yazidi population. She once again returned to the region in January 2018 for a coming article in The Times Magazine. On a drive to the Iraq-Syria border during her last trip, Rubin found that competing military and militia groups had set up checkpoints everywhere, making travel increasingly difficult. The following is an account of the nine hours it took her and h..

At 12, His Science Video Went Viral. At 14, He Fears He Was Too Rude.

Science

At 12, His Science Video Went Viral. At 14, He Fears He Was Too Rude.
Marco Zozaya critiqued those linking vaccines and autism, but he struggles like many science communicators with social media platforms that may favor a style that inflames.

Marco Zozaya loves science. His bedroom wall is covered in photos of scientists. When he grows up, he wants to be a science communicator like Neil deGrasse Tyson. And for a moment at age 12, when he recorded a video about vaccines on an iPad in his backyard in northeast Mexico, it seemed like he was off to a good start.
“Every single bit of evidence there is in the observable universe that vaccines do cause autism is inside of this folder,” he says in the nearly two-year-old video. Then, in mock shock, he starts pulling out blank pieces of paper. “It’s nothing.”

The video got 8 million views on Facebook and was featured by HuffPost, CNN, Cosmopolitan and Latina.com. And that was when Mr. Zozaya started to discover that maybe it’s n..