Tech Tip: Cleaning Out Addresses in Mail App

Cleaning Out Addresses in Mail App Q. When I write emails to colleagues and friends after typing the first several letters of the email address on my Mac using the Mail app, the program automatically fills in the balance of the address. I have 20 years of history of email, and often the address used is no longer the correct one. How do you get rid of old addresses?
A. When some of the email addresses in the Mail program’s memory become obsolete, you can prune the outdated entries or update them on the spot. In the Mail app, go to the Window menu and choose Previous Recipients. The Previous Recipients box opens with a list of addresses you have used for earlier messages.
To delete an old address, select it and click the Remove From List button in the bottom-left corner of the box. To select multiple names for removal at once, hold down the Mac’s Command key and click through the list.
Photo The Previous Recipients box in the Mac's Mail program gives you the chance to delete outda..

On the Runway: Men’s Wear Just Had a Huge Designer Reshuffle: What Does it Mean?

Supported by Fashion & Style Men’s Wear Just Had a Huge Designer Reshuffle: What Does it Mean? Photo Kris Van Assche, shown at the end of the spring 2017 Dior Homme show in Paris, is becoming the artistic director at Berluti. Credit Francois Guillot/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images British cabinet reshuffles have nothing on the men’s wear world. On Tuesday, LVMH Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton announced that Kris Van Assche would become the new artistic director of Berluti, completing the final move in what may be the biggest reinvention yet of the men’s side of the world’s largest luxury group.
Not that the announcement put it that way, exactly. What Antoine Arnault, chief executive of Berluti, said in a brief statement was simply, “I am delighted to welcome Kris Van Assche to Berluti. I have known him for several years, have always admired his work at Dior Homme and I am looking forward to working with him.”
Look at the bigger picture, however.
Hedi Slimane, who spent seven years..

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela reveals South Africa’s uncomfortable truths

In 2010, when Alice Walker was in South Africa to deliver the annual Steve Biko Memorial Lecture, I was invited to interview the great American writer. It was Walker's first visit to the country, and for reasons I could not fathom at the time, the director of the Steve Biko Foundation presented me with a list of subjects that were off-limits. Top of the list was Winnie Madikizela-Mandela.

Battle over De La Rue's blue passport printing descends into farce

The printer is reportedly appealing the decision to award the contract to print post Brexit passports to a Franco-Dutch firm, prolonging minsters' agony
Feeling blue at the end of the Easter break? Fear not! If you’re the sort of person who laughs at absurdity there’s truckload full of it to start the working week courtesy of passport printer De La Rue.
The company that likes to boast of how it prints documents for the world, is, we are told, going to appeal against the world coming in to print documents for Britain.
De La Rue is hoping to capitalise on the firestorm it ignited over the half billion pound contract to print the post-Brexit blue passport being awarded (hee hee) to French-Dutch firm Gemalto on account of it offering a the best deal for the taxpayer.
Read more British passport contract decision postponed after De La Rue appeal De La Rue will appeal decision to give blue passport contract De La Rue shares drop as contract for blue passport heads overseas With ..

The changing face of the CEO: Why executives must engage with their public when a crisis occurs

For the first time in history, chief executives have the opportunity to connect in a meaningful way with their customers and clients
There was a time when a chief executive just had to run the business. In 1955, Fortune described the “successful American executive” as someone who spent almost no time on politics, drank moderately, and only attended cultural events “because they must”. These chief execs weren’t household names or familiar faces. They could hide away in their office. They could take the train home without being recognised. And if they wanted to, they could segment their audiences, “optimising” what they said for each group, from the public to the staff to the regulator. If they weren’t consistent, no one would know. No one would remember. And no one would be able to do much with the information anyway.
Fast forward to today. It’s been fifteen years since Michael Bloomberg became mayor of New York and proved you could be both a corporate leader and a politician. Donald ..