Nonfiction: A Reckoning With an Imperfect Science in ‘Blue Dreams’

Supported by Book Review | Nonfiction A Reckoning With an Imperfect Science in ‘Blue Dreams’ Photo Credit Sophy Hollington BLUE DREAMS
The Science and the Story of the Drugs That Changed Our Minds
By Lauren Slater
400 pp. Little, Brown & Company. $28.
In 1988, Lauren Slater put a single cream-and-green pill in her mouth and, with a sip of water, became one of the first patients in the United States to take Prozac. She also emerged as one of its most poetic chroniclers when she detailed her heady, complex love affair with the drug in “Prozac Diary” (1998).
Thirty years since that first dose, neither Slater nor the drug has aged particularly well. Slater, who has spent much of her life wrestling with bipolar and obsessive-compulsive disorders, jumped from an initial prescription of 10 milligrams to 20 to 30 to 60, landing at 80 mg, which is where she left off in “Prozac Diary.” A doctor eventually upped her dose to 100 mg a day — 20 beyond what’s F.D.A. approved. But the drug tha..

Disney Offers to Buy Sky News to Aid Rupert Murdoch’s Bid for Sky

Disney Offers to Buy Sky News to Aid Rupert Murdoch’s Bid for Sky Photo Disney has offered to buy Sky News outright to help Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox, the bulk of whose assets it hopes to buy, gain regulatory approval its own bid to buy the news channel’s parent company. Credit David Moir/Reuters LONDON — The Walt Disney Company offered to buy Sky News on Tuesday — but not because the British news channel is core to Disney’s business.
Instead, the offer is meant to help Rupert Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox buy full control of Sky News’s parent company, the broadcaster Sky, a deal that has languished amid concern here in Britain that Mr. Murdoch could assume too much control over the country’s media.
Disney has a stake in the outcome of that transaction. It agreed late last year to buy the bulk of Fox’s assets — including Mr. Murdoch’s international broadcasting operations, of which Sky is a part — for $52.4 billion. And it is competing against Comcast, the American cable giant tha..

Recent Commercial Real Estate Transactions

Supported by Commercial Real Estate Recent Commercial Real Estate Transactions Photo A five-story mixed-use 2001 building at 641 President Street in Park Slope, Brooklyn, was one of three buildings in a $12.6 million deal. RECENT SALE$12.6 MILLION
641 President Street and 682 Union Street (between Fourth and Fifth Avenues)
Park Slope, Brooklyn
A local private investor has bought these two properties, consisting of three interconnected buildings, which together offer a cap rate of 5.1 percent. Two of the buildings, adding up to 13,850 square feet, are at the 641 President Street address. A mixed-use, 25-foot-wide, five-story elevator building there, completed in 2001, features four market-rate apartments — two one-bedrooms and two two-bedrooms — as well as a vacant ground-floor retail space, once a cafe and juice bar. A long hallway from it leads into the second building, a fully occupied 17-unit, two-story 1920 office building. The office building has an exit at 682 Union Street, ..

Tesla Reports Progress in Model 3 Production

Supported by Business Day Tesla Reports Progress in Model 3 Production Photo A Model 3 sedan, Tesla’s first car built for the mass market, at a company event in Hawthorne, Calif., in 2016. Credit Joe White/Reuters Tesla said on Tuesday that it had produced almost 10,000 Model 3 electric cars in the first three months of 2018, a significant increase from the fourth quarter of last year but still short of the goal that investors hoped the company would reach.
The company said it had expanded output of the Model 3, its first mass-market offering, by “rapidly addressing production and supply chain bottlenecks, including several short factory shutdowns to upgrade equipment.”
The Model 3 is critical to Tesla’s efforts to shore up its finances and generate revenue to repay investors and to develop other vehicles, including an electric truck.
In the past seven days, Tesla said, it produced 2,000 Model 3 vehicles, a rate it expects to sustain in the coming week.
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RAC forced to apologise to customers after breaking financial watchdog's insurance rules

The regulator brought in new rules around renewal premiums last April, and reminded insurers of them in October
The financial watchdog has forced the RAC to contact its customers after finding it failed to provide proper information about insurance renewals.
The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) brought in rules last year which require companies to clearly show the insurance premium a customer paid last year alongside their proposed renewal premium, and to show a prominent, clear and straightforward message to encourage customers to shop around.
Read more Car insurance premiums rise in last quarter of 2017 On Tuesday the regulator said the RAC was “failing to display the prior and current year premiums, and shopping around message as key information in its breakdown policy renewal documentation”.
“It is simply unacceptable to see that some firms are still not being properly transparent with their customers a year on from the introduction of the rules. Firms failing to get this ..